Orlando Home Inspection - 50 Most Common Problem with New Homes
   
50 Most Common Problems with New Homes: 41 thru 50

41.   Door to the basement is missing a door sweep and weather-stripping. Unconditioned air can enter the conditioned space. Any opening from a conditioned space to a non-conditioned space must be weather-stripped or sealed. (1995 CABO Model Energy Code 502.3 & 602.3)

42.   Basement ceiling height is too low.  Basement ceiling ducts are too low and will prevent installing a ceiling at the proper height. Habitable shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet 6 inches. Furred areas shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet.   (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 305.1)

43.   Garage floor does not slope enough to prevent liquids from running under the walls.  Flammable liquids could run under the walls into the structure and be ignited by the basement furnace or water heater. That area of floor used for parking of automobiles or other vehicles shall be sloped to facilitate the movement of liquids to a drain or toward the main vehicle entry doorway. (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 309.3)

44.   Garage furnace and water heater gas piping is not protected from possible impact. An automobile could hit the piping and cause a gas leak. The pipe must be protected from possible impact. (2000 Standard Gas Code 305.4)

45.   Ground fault circuit interrupter electrical outlet is missing at a wet location. Any electrical outlet located in the bathrooms, kitchen counter area, unfinished basement, garage or on the exterior of the structure that can be reached from the ground, must be GFCI protected. (1999 NEC 210-8(6))  

46.   Ground fault circuit interrupter electrical outlet is missing at a sink.  Any electrical outlet located within 6 feet of a sink or basin must be GFCI protected. (1999 NEC 210-8(b)

47.   No heating and air conditioning damper system present to balance the heating and air conditioning. A two story structure  with a single heat and air conditioning system, will find it difficult to balance the heating and cooling. A readily accessible manual or automatic damper system shall be provided to partially restrict or shut off the heating and/or cooling input to each zone or floor.  (1995 CABO Model Energy Code 503.6.3 & 603.3.2.1)

48.   Furnace ductwork not properly sealed to prevent air leakage in nonconditioned areas.  Sometimes the duct insulation is sealed, but the actual ducts are not sealed. All ducts must be sealed at the furnace and at the register boots. All joints shall be securely fastened and sealed with welds, gaskets, mastic adhesives, mastic-plus-embedded-fabric systems or tapes. (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 1401.5)(1994 Standard Mechanical Code 304.4)(2000 Standard Mechanical Code 306.3)

49.   Attic furnace does not have the required working platform in front of the furnace for servicing. This makes it difficult to service the unit or change the filter. A working platform, 30" deep with a clear headroom of 30" high, is required along the control side of the furnace.   (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 1401.5)(1994 Standard Mechanical Code 304.4)(2000 Standard Mechanical Code 306.3)

50.   Range is missing anti-tip brackets on the rear feet to prevent tipping over. All manufacturer's supply anti-tip brackets with all free standing ranges to prevent tipping. A heavy object such as a turkey can be placed on the open door causing the range to tip spilling hot liquids from the burners.  (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 108.1)

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