Orlando Home Inspection - 50 Most Common Problem with New Homes
   
50 Most Common Problems with New Homes: 31 thru 40

31.   Basement ceiling needs firestopping around all pipe penetrations. Firestopping prevents a fire from spreading to different parts of the structure. Firestopping is required at all openings around vents, pipes, ducts, chimneys and fireplaces at ceiling and floor levels, with noncombustible materials. (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 602.7)

32.   Doors and windows are missing shims and anchors along the jambs. All doors and windows need shimming along the jambs (sides) and proper anchorage for a proper installation. (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 108.1)

33.   Bedroom windows not large enough to be used for an emergency exit. Each bedroom shall have an operable window with sill height no more than 44" above the floor. Minimum clear height of 22" or minimum width of 20". The net clear opening shall be 4 square feet. (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 310.2)

34.   Fireplace has wood trim within too close to the opening. Wood to close to the opening is a fire hazard and could catch fire. Woodwork or other combustible materials shall not be placed within 6 inches of a fireplace opening. Combustible material within 12 inches of the fireplace opening shall no project more than 1/8 inch for each 1 inch distance from such opening. (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 1003.10)

35.   Fireplace gas starter valve is not accessible while lighting the starter. This allows a dangerous build-up of gas before being able to light the burner. Fireplace gas starters must be within 4' of the valve. (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 2606.4)

36.   Step heights or tread depths are not the proper size. These are potential trip hazards. The maximum allowable step height is 7 3/4". The minimum allowed depth of the tread is 9". (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 314.2)

37.   Step heights or tread widths vary in a flight of stairs. The different step heights or widths could be a trip hazard. Risers (heights) and treads (widths) may not vary more than 3/8". (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 314.2)

38.   Stair tread nosing or overhang extends too far over the step below. The edge of the steps could break with the grain of the wood allowing someone to fall down the stairs. The maximum allowable overhang is 1 1/4". (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 314.2.1)

39.   Top basement step is not deep enough. Sometimes the oak flooring overhangs the top tread too far. This is a potential trip hazard. The minimum allowed depth of the tread is 9". (314.2) The maximum allowable projection or nosing is 1 1/4". (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 314.2.1)

40.   Stairs are missing a 36" deep landing at the bottom of the stairs between the bottom step and the door. Any flight of stairs that are used for an emergency exit must have a landing at the bottom before opening a door. A minimum of 3 foot landing shall be required on each side of an egress door. (1995 CABO 1 & 2 Family Dwelling Code, Section 312.1)

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